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Why Managers Should Be Coaches

Leaders are increasingly moving away from a “telling” model of managing and more towards one of inspiring. In the past, managers were expected to tell their people what to do and make sure they did it. If employees completed their work, the manager would reward them. If they failed, the manager would punish them. This simplistic approach at best gets the job done. However, it fails to inspire, build relationships between managers and employees, and get the most out of people. Coaching, on the other hand, is designed to elicit self-motivation from employees.  

 Here are 3 reasons why coaching works: 

  1. It gives the employee a chance to express themselves and foster self-awareness. Coaches ask employees to envision their ideal life and explore their desires and motivations. Managers who don’t coach may or may not know what their employees want. They may even assume the wants of the employees and place them on a career trajectory that doesn’t align with their desires, talents, and motivations. Coaches provide space for employees to think outside the box about their careers while taking the time to learn what inspires them. 
  2. It builds trust between the employee and manager. Trust between managers and employees is imperative to a productive workplace. If employees are distrusting or suspicious of management, you definitely won’t be getting the most out of them, and they may even be counterproductive. Trust and respect for management is arguably the most motivating force for employees to deliver results.  
  3. It transforms workplace culture. Coaching relationships naturally become deep and rich. When leaders are trained to listen intently, ask good questions, and build relationships, the whole organization starts to change. When people are treated with the intention and care that comes with a coaching relationship, they tend to pass that on. In other words, coaches lead by example, enacting a powerful ripple effect across the organization. 

French writer Antoine de Saint-Exupéry was ahead of his time in the 1900s when he said: 

“If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea.” 

The best leaders don’t simply manage. They inspire people to self-manage. In essence, workplace coaching teaches employees to “yearn for the vast and endless sea.” It creates self-motivated employees who care about the overall organizational mission and their role in pursuing that mission. 

 

 

Leaders are increasingly moving away from a “telling” model of managing and more towards one of inspiring. In the past, managers were expected to tell their people what to do and make sure they did it. If employees completed their work, the manager would reward them. If they failed, the manager would punish them. This simplistic approach at best gets the job done. However, it fails to inspire, build relationships between managers and employees, and get the most out of people. Coaching, on the other hand, is designed to elicit self-motivation from employees.  

 Here are 3 reasons why coaching works: 

  1. It gives the employee a chance to express themselves and foster self-awareness. Coaches ask employees to envision their ideal life and explore their desires and motivations. Managers who don’t coach may or may not know what their employees want. They may even assume the wants of the employees and place them on a career trajectory that doesn’t align with their desires, talents, and motivations. Coaches provide space for employees to think outside the box about their careers while taking the time to learn what inspires them. 
  2. It builds trust between the employee and manager. Trust between managers and employees is imperative to a productive workplace. If employees are distrusting or suspicious of management, you definitely won’t be getting the most out of them, and they may even be counterproductive. Trust and respect for management is arguably the most motivating force for employees to deliver results.  
  3. It transforms workplace culture. Coaching relationships naturally become deep and rich. When leaders are trained to listen intently, ask good questions, and build relationships, the whole organization starts to change. When people are treated with the intention and care that comes with a coaching relationship, they tend to pass that on. In other words, coaches lead by example, enacting a powerful ripple effect across the organization. 

French writer Antoine de Saint-Exupéry was ahead of his time in the 1900s when he said: 

“If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea.” 

The best leaders don’t simply manage. They inspire people to self-manage. In essence, workplace coaching teaches employees to “yearn for the vast and endless sea.” It creates self-motivated employees who care about the overall organizational mission and their role in pursuing that mission. 

 

 

Post Categories: Insights
Date Published: Feb 23, 2022
Post Categories: Insights
Date Published: Feb 23, 2022